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The first quarter of the 2008 fundraising period brought exciting news for ActBlue, as we broke two records and watched surging numbers of pages, donors, and dollars. Even though this quarter falls right before tax day and the media has recently been claiming that Democrats are divided, these new records  prove that Democrats are enthusiastically behind Democratic candidates and organizations

FIRST RECORD: Most money raised in a single day
Just when we thought the quarter couldn’t get any better, ActBlue raised $799,827.60 on the last day of the quarter.  This is as much in a single day as ActBlue’s entire first year in operation.

SECOND RECORD: Most money raised in an election cycle
Raising $24 million from 54,918 donors, ActBlue also reached a new record for the amount of money raised in one election cycle. As the total number of ActBlue contributions hit $42,351,009 yesterday, this $24 million represents 57 percent of all contributions made to ActBlue.

Each day this week, we will break down one facet of the quarterly stats report.  By comparing the 2008 first quarter statistics with the previous quarter (Q4 2007) and ActBlue’s lifetime totals, you will see how far we’ve come, and what we need to hit our goals of raising $100 million for Democrats and adding 10,000 new fundraisers by election day. Here is the schedule:

Tuesday
Raw Numbers System-Wide

Wednesday
Top 10 Candidates by donors and dollars

Thursday
Top 10 Fundraising pages by donors and dollars

Friday
Top 10 Pages with Highest Percentage of Tippers

Democratic fundraising is surging across
the board, as indicated by record-breaking EOQ totals at the Democratic
fundraising hub ActBlue. Fundraising on the site reached an
unprecedented $24 million from more than 199,069 donors*,
contributing to an all-time total of more than $42.35 million.

ActBlue broke a second record yesterday, raising more in one day than
ever before ($799,827.60), nearly as much in a single day as in its entire
first year in operation, when the group first raised eyebrows in
traditional Democratic fundraising circles.

ActBlue, the nation’s largest source of funds for Democrats, produces a
set of tools that allow individuals and groups to raise money for the
candidates and causes of their choice, tools that now power the
fundraising operations of hundreds of congressional and senatorial
candidates and dozens of officeholders. In the four years since its
inception, ActBlue users have outpaced MoveOn and EMILY’s List in
raising funds for Democrats, and bested Republican rivals by several
orders of magnitude.

A list of top fundraisers on ActBlue and top recipients of ActBlue funds is below.

Top fundraisers on ActBlue include groups from every part of the
Democratic spectrum, from establishment Democrats and elected officials
to insurgent Democratic candidates to networks of prominent bloggers.
       

We’ll be highlighting specifics in this week’s Stats Week posts. Stay tuned!

*An earlier version of this post cited 55,000 donors. That’s the number of donors this quarter, not this cycle. Our apologies!

Congressional candidate Donna Edwards is ActBlue’s newest greatest fan. Using ActBlue, Edwards’ Maryland campaign raised $405,133 from 7,286 supporters around the country, building the local and national grassroots network critical to her primary win last week.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what Donna said Sunday on YouTube:

ActBlue completely transformed the way that we raised money for this campaign. [I]t took what we were doing at the grassroots level here in the Fourth Congressional District and it spread the message around the country, and so we didn’t just have the Maryland grassroots, we had the national grassroots. It really was because of ActBlue.

[I]’m excited about that, because it means that you…remove the K Street lobbyists from the equation, and candidates like me can rely on small contributions from around the country to support our candidacies. And then it means that…we don’t really have to listen to those guys. We can actually act on our own, and work on policy that makes a difference in people’s lives. ActBlue is tremendous.

Edwards is the first Maryland challenger to defeat an incumbent in the primary in sixteen years—this time by almost fourteen points. The Washington Post calls Edwards’ success the product of a “successful cooperative effort.”

And we know exactly what they’re talking about. They’re talking about you.

Well done.

(Back to work.)

The Virginia Legislature is
considering a bill (HB 359) that would require campaigns to attribute
contributions made to them via political action committees to the
individual donor rather than the PAC.

The bill is primarily geared to two PACs, ActBlue and Red Storm.  ActBlue has long supported efforts to increase transparency in politics
and is pleased to endorse HB359.

Earlier today Executive Director Jonathan Zucker told reporters:

We’re very excited about this
at ActBlue.  This is how
things work at the federal level and in several other states, but
Virginia’s legal structures haven’t permitted this kind of reporting
until now.  We’re thrilled to see Virginia moving in this direction. We
thrive on transparency, and we know that politics does, too.

ActBlue is pleased to announce that we’re now active for state races in New York.  You can now contribute to Democrats running in state elections through ActBlue.  Better yet, set up your own page and start fundraising!

Everyone here at ActBlue is very excited about this development.  To mark the occasion we’ll be livebloging on The Albany Project tonight, 1/31/08 starting at 7PM.  Political Director Erin Hill, Deputy Political Director Nate Thames, and Netroots Coordinator Melissa Ryan will be on hand to answer you questions.

To learn more about this exciting development here’s our press release:

ACTBLUE GOES LIVE IN NEW YORK STATE

CAMBRIDGE, MA, JANUARY 31,
2008? ActBlue, the online platform that allows Democrats to raise funds
for the candidates of their choice, is now active in New York State.
With the launch, ActBlue puts a new tool into the hands of Democrats
across the state, allowing them for the first time to support not only
federal candidates but statewide candidates, party committees and
Democrats running for State Senate and State Assembly.

State party co-chairman David Pollak heralded ActBlue’s arrival in
New York today.  "ActBlue has proven to be an invaluable resource for
Democratic candidates across the country," says Pollak. "By adding
functionality for state legislative candidates, ActBlue will play a
critical role in helping Democrats at the grassroots level get involved
in the effort to take back the New York State Senate."

Beyond party activity, the entry of ActBlue into New York will make
it possible for individuals in New York State to start mobilizing
friends and colleagues in support of Democratic candidates at all
levels.  Much as in Virginia, where a broad coalition of activists and
bloggers joined hands through ActBlue with Governor Kaine and the state
party to take back the Virginia Senate for the first time in a decade,
ActBlue will facilitate cooperation between New York Democratic
institutions and communities of Democrats from upstate to Manhattan.

"This is something that those of us focused on state level races in
New York have been wanting for at least two years, and we are beyond
excited that this day has finally come," says Phillip Anderson,
editor-in-chief of the Albany Project, a prominent blog devoted to
Democratic victories in New York State. "I think that we may look back
on this day a year from now and see this as a real game-changing event
in the effort to take our state government back."

ActBlue has enabled individuals and groups across the country to
raise more than $36 million for Democratic candidates and committees
since 2004. More important, says executive director Jonathan Zucker,
ActBlue has built a new kind of infrastructure capable not only of
raising untapped millions at unprecedented speed but also of mobilizing
support for Democrats in the closest races. "Building infrastructure is
the most important thing we can be doing as a party," says Zucker. "We
ran wheezing behind Republicans for years when it came to
infrastructure, but ActBlue’s $36 million is proof positive that we’re
not only catching up but on course to win."  Zucker is expecting
ActBlue’s funding total to top $100 million this cycle.

ActBlue will be live blogging from their headquarters tonight from 7 to 8 at the Albany Project, online at http://thealbanyproject.com.

We’re back from Yearly Kos in Chicago and we were greeted by a great sight, a feature in the Boston Globe! Here’s the story…

410wCAMBRIDGE — The new headquarters
of ActBlue, with its tangled cords, leftover Deval Patrick signs, and
20-somethings tapping on white MacBook laptops, is what a political
campaign would look like if it shared space with a dot-com start-up.

ActBlue is in fact both — an Internet-based
political action committee that is quietly becoming one of the biggest
forces in Democratic politics. Its founders aim for nothing short of
revolution, and they are already partway there.

The PAC, operated
from a former architecture studio on Arrow Street near Harvard Square,
functions as an online clearinghouse for campaign contributions to
Democrats of all stripes, allowing anyone in the country to donate any
allowable amount to any candidate with the click of a mouse: You send
the money to ActBlue (actblue.com), and ActBlue funnels it to the campaigns. This gives local, state, and national Democratic candidates a cheap, efficient means of building a base of supporters over the Internet.

This
simple but transformative concept has raised $25.5 million and counting
since its creation in Cambridge in 2004, when two computer-savvy
scientists with liberal leanings set out to take political action in a
new direction. They believed that armies of small donors, mobilized
effectively, could be more potent than the “bun dlers” who have
dominated fund-raising by amassing checks from wealthy contributors.

Today,
with that philosophy ascendant and the 2008 presidential campaign
breaking all fund-raising records, ActBlue has become a unique bundler
of the unbundled. It is reshaping political
fund-raising and giving the Democratic Party a powerful, lasting
resource for presidential contests, state legislative races, and
everything in between.

“There’s a huge opportunity to involve
many times more people in this process than we currently have,” said
Benjamin Rahn, 30, a Harvard graduate who suspended his doctoral work
in theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology to
found ActBlue with Matt DeBergalis, 29, a technology whiz out of MIT.

ActBlue,
in coordination with campaigns, bloggers, and individuals across the
country, has funneled donations to 1,500 Democratic candidates to date.
It moved $17 million to candidates in the 2005-2006 election cycle,
including about $15.5 million to congressional campaigns, part of a
tide of support that flipped the House and Senate to Democratic control.

ActBlue
appears to have been far and away the biggest direct donor to
congressional candidates of either party last fall. “They are
revolutionizing approaches to fund-raising,” said Anthony Corrado, a
specialist on campaign finance at Colby College.

Rahn and
DeBergalis say they are just getting started. They predict confidently
that they will move $100 million in the 2007-2008 cycle.

Indeed,
their fund-raising this year suggests that the PAC will be an even
bigger player in the months ahead. Through the end of June, ActBlue had
already raised $6.6 million in 2007. In the last off-year, 2005, it
took ActBlue 12 months to raise $1.6 million. The 28,925 new
contributors who signed up in April, May, and June of this year
represented 13 percent of its overall number of contributors.

Continued after the jump…

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